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SureSteel® Stainless Steel Tactile Indicators

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What Type of Tactile Indicators Do I Need?

There are two types of Tactile Ground Surface Indicators used for different purposes: Directional and Hazard/Warning Tactile Indicators. Directional (Ribbed) Tactile Indicators are used to give directional orientation, such as leading pedestrians along a pathway, indicating the position of kerb ramps at intersections or that the road entrance is more than 3m from the property line. On the other hand, Hazard/Warning (Studded) Indicators are used to warn of hazards, such as platforms at train stations, car park driveways, pedestrian crossings and the top and bottom of stairways. Depending on the installation environment, you may also require special Tactile Indicators to withstand the elements, such as our SureSteel® marine grade 316 stainless steel Indicators for exposure to seawater.

What’s Special About Our SureSteel® Tactile Indicators Range?

Not only are these compliant to the Australian Standards AS1428:2009 and AS4586:2013 with R13 slip resistance rating, our SureSteel® Tactile Indicators are also made of marine grade stainless steel. This means that they withstand corrosion from exposure to seawater.

Additionally, the Stainless Steel Spigot-Backed range feature CTA’s Drill&Lock® design, making them easier and faster to install than standard Spigot Tactile Indicators. No adhesives are required so the area is accessible almost immediately after installation.

Depending on the installation environment, you may also require special Tactile Indicators to withstand the elements, such as our SureSteel® marine grade 316 stainless steel Indicators for exposure to seawater.

What are the Australian Standards for Installing Tactile Indicators?

The Australian Standard AS1428 mandates the consistent application of Tactile Indicators so users can be confident that the cues correctly reflect the space that they are navigating. To comply with this Australian Standard, Tactile Indicators must be laid out to achieve certain luminance contrast, be in a specific size, shape and layout and there needs to be a minimum distance between the tactile area and potential hazard.

Most individuals with vision impairment still retain some sight. Hence, to comply with the Australian Standard AS1428, Tactile Indicators must have a minimum contrast to the surrounding ground surface or substrate:

  • • Integrated Tactile Indicators - Minimum of 30% luminance contrast.
  • • Discrete/Individual Single-Colour Tactile Indicators – Minimum of 45% luminance contrast.
  • • Discrete/Individual Two-Colour Tactile Indicators – Minimum of 60% luminance contrast. An example of a Two-Colour Tactile Indicator is when the colour at the top is different from that on the side.

Before installing Tactile Surface Indicators, ensure that your Tactile Indicator installation guide or installation service team follows the Australian Standard AS1428 so that you remain compliant.